Children's ice skates (2 of 5)



Fig.1: Friesland children's ice skates, c.1880
The broken wood of the prow of one of these ice skates has been repaired by means of a piece of tin plate. This detail makes them interesting as it is a miracle they did survive.

Manufacturer: unknown; mark: none
Technical data: total length: 25 cm long; height over ice: 6.3 cm; platforms: 18 cm long, 4 cm wide; runner blades: 12 mm tall, 3 mm thick; weight: 113 g


Fig.2: Friesland children's ice skates, c.1930

The difference with the skates in figure 1 is found in the less taller prow. This was done for safety reasons.

Manufacturer: unknown; mark: none
Technical data: total length: 22 cm; height over ice: 4.3 cm; platforms: 18 cm long, 4 cm wide; runner blades: 13 mm tall, 3 mm thick; weight: 110 g including straps


Fig.3: Friesland children's ice skates, c.1950

These skates have extended runner blades as to make them even still safer.

Manufacturer: unknown; mark: none
Technical data: total length: 22 cm; height over ice: 4.3 cm; platforms: 18 cm long, 4 cm wide; runner blades: 13 mm tall, 3 mm thick; weight: 110 g including straps


Fig.4: Friesland children's ice skates, c.1970

These skates are about 100 years younger than the skates in figure 1; yet they look much the same. But all that in the course of the years has been considered to make skating safer and more attractive has been applied.

Manufacturer: unknown; mark: none
Technical data: total length: 22 cm; height over ice: 4.3 cm; platforms: 18 cm long, 4 cm wide; runner blades: 13 mm tall, 3 mm thick; weight: 110 g including straps

 











Learning how to skate
literally is a matter of
falling and getting up
again.

Most Dutch children
are three or four
years of age
when they get their
first ice skates.
 
Before they know
to skate alone
some winters will pass.
In the mean time
 their feet grow fast.

At present
many parents do not
see this as a problem:
they visit eBay
or buy new ones
if necessary.

But in ancient times
this was different
as a pair of ice skates
cost a day's wage
or more and the
average family
comprised 4-6 children.

Therefore the skates
went from parents
to children and stayed
in the family
from child to child.

Often children learned
skating on
two different skates
that matched
more or less.

Hence, children's skates
were repaired
and repaired again
and were only
thrown away when
completely
worn out.

 

|  to page   1   2   3   4   5  |
2002-12 The virtual Ice Skates Museum. All rights reserved.
home | sitemap | copyright | contact